Herbivory potential of postlarval brown shrimp associated with salt marshes
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Herbivory potential of postlarval brown shrimp associated with salt marshes

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Published by Sea Grant College Program, Texas A & M University in College Station, Tex .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Penaeus aztecus.,
  • Penaeus aztecus -- Feeding and feeds.,
  • Penaeus aztecus -- Growth.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesJournal of experimental marine biology and ecology. Vol. 84.
StatementDaniel F. Gleason and Roger J. Zimmerman.
SeriesTAMU-SG -- 85-820., TAMU-SG -- no. 85-820.
ContributionsZimmerman, Roger J., Texas A & M University. Sea Grant College Program.
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 235-246 :
Number of Pages246
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16115071M

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Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to identify the sources of food in the natural diet of postlarval brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus Ives). A series of enclosures placed in East Lagoon (29°20′N; 94°45′W) on Galveston Island, Texas, USA, in May , were used to evaluate the individual and combined contribution of Spartina alterniflora detritus, epiphytes of S. alterniflora Cited by: Utilization of salt marsh plants by postlarval brown shrimp: Carbon assimilation rates and food preferences Article (PDF Available) in Marine Ecology Progress Series January Author: Daniel Gleason.   Postlarval Penaeus setiferus (Linnaeus), the white shrimp, and Penaeus aztecus (Ives), the brown shrimp, were reared for 24 days on vegetal, animal, and combination diets. Incremental weight change was used to compare shrimp growth rates among dietary treatments. Both species grew most quickly when fed a combination by: Herbivory potential of postlarval brown shrimp associated with salt marshes. The value of salt marsh edge vs. interior as a habitat for fish and decapod crustaceans in a Louisiana tidal marsh. Effects of temperature and salinity on thermal death in postlarval brown shrimp. Penaeus aztecus. Physiological Zoology –

Herbivory potential of postlarval brown shrimp associated with salt marshes. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology – CrossRef Google Scholar. Gleason, D. F. and R. J. Zimmerman. Herbivory potential of postlarval brown shrimp associated with salt marshes. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology – CrossRef Google Scholar.   The maximum DOC concentration recorded in unfiltered pond water, mg/1, was low relative to salt marsh and estuarine waters (Table 6). Gleason, D.F. & R.J. Zimmerman, Herbivory potential of postlarval brown shrimp associated with salt marshes. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol., Vol. 84, pp. R.J. ZimmermanHerbivory potential of.   We examined the potential of using an enriched stable isotope (15 N) to trace the assimilation of individual protein sources from compound aquaculture diets by juvenile Penaeus used the marine diatom Chaetoceros muelleri as a source of plant protein and the brine shrimp (Artemia) as a source of animal diatoms were labelled by replacing 5% of the .

The growth, survival, digestive enzyme activity and biochemical composition ofPenaeus japonicus (Bate) larvae and postlarvae were measured under three feeding regimes. Larvae were reared through the protozoeal stages usingChaetoceros gracilis. From the first mysis stage, three feeding regimes were used; (A)C. gracilis plusArtemia sp. nauplii, (B)Artemia sp. nauplii alone or (C)C. gracilis alone. with overfeeding as well as those associated. with costs. Given tank volume ( L) and the in Texas salt marsh. Marine Biology – Herbivory. potential of postlarval brown. We estimated actual 2-week mortalities of postlarval and juvenile brown shrimp in a Galveston Bay salt marsh by comparing densities of cohorts throughout the spring. Mortalities ranged between 33%. Food resources of postlar val brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) in Texas salt marsh. Herbivory potential of postlarval brown. shrimp associated with marshes. J. Exp. Biol. Ecol.,