National Job Corps study: the benefits and costs of Job Corps
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National Job Corps study: the benefits and costs of Job Corps

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Published by U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration in Washington, DC (200 Constitution Ave., Washington, 20210) .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Job Corps (U.S.) -- Evaluation.,
  • Youth -- Employment -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementSheena McConnell, Steven Glazerman.
SeriesResearch and evaluation report series ;, 01-M, Research and evaluation report series (Washington, D.C.) ;, 01-M.
ContributionsGlazerman, Steven., United States. Employment and Training Administration. Office of Policy and Research., Mathematica Policy Research, inc.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD6273 .M395 2001
The Physical Object
Paginationxxii, 161, [109] p. :
Number of Pages161
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3997954M
LC Control Number2001344252

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National Job Corps Study: The Benefits and Costs of Job Corps () Abstract: This report presents the findings of a benefit-cost analysis of Job Corps. In a benefit-cost analysis, a dollar value is placed on each program impact. By measuring impacts in dollars, a benefit-cost analysis enables policymakers to compare the diverse benefits of Job Corps with its costs. Additional Physical Format: McConnell, Sheena M. National Job Corps study: the benefits and costs of Job Corps xxii, , [] p. (OCoLC)   Using this strategy, a fair reading of the evidence suggests that Job Corps was beneficial for the older students (a pre-specified primary subgroup): benefits exceeded costs; primary impacts were marginally significant in some years; employment and earnings were higher for the treatment group in all years but one; and secondary and process analyses provide supporting evidence. National Job Corps study: the benefits and costs of Job Corps / By Sheena M. McConnell, Steven. Glazerman, inc. Mathematica Policy Research and United States. Employment and Training Administration. Office of Policy and Research. Abstract "MPR reference no. ""Contract no. K""Submitted to U.S. Department of Labor.

• Because overall earnings gains do not persist, the benefits to society of Job Corps are smaller than the substantial program costs. The finding that costs exceed benefits for the full sample holds under a wide range of reasonable assumptions. However, Job Corps appears to be cost-effective for the to year-olds, whose. National Job Corps Study in The National Job Corps Study is the first nationally representative experimental evaluation of a federal employment and training program for disadvantaged youths, unlike previous evalu-ations of similar programs that were conducted in purposively selected sites only (Robert J. LaLonde , ). U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. Through the Economic Opportunity Act of , Congress established Job Corps, a national vocational and academic training program for disadvantaged youth ages 16 to The program costs the federal government $ billion a year, making it one of the most expensive education and training programs funded by the . In addition, the cost-benefit analysis found that, overall, program costs were greater than the benefits, although the program was cost-effective for older participants. Over the past several years the U.S. Department of Labor has worked to improve Job Corps, with the goal of better serving youth.

Benefits and costs measured included the following: (1) benefits of increased output resulting from the additional productivity of Job Corps participants; (2) benefits from reduced use of other programs and services; (3) benefits from reduced crime committed by or against participants; and (4) program costs and costs of resources used by Job Corps. Benefits and costs were measured from the . Sheena McConnell & Steven Glazerman, "National Job Corps Study: The Benefits and Costs of Job Corps," Mathematica Policy Research Reports. The benefits and costs of JTPA Title II-A programs: Key findings from the National Job Training Partnership Act Study Bloom, Howard S. et. al. (). The .   residential setting at Job Corps centers. The program’s objective is to help disconnected youth become more responsible, employable, and productive citizens. Each year, Job Corps serves more t youth, at a cost of more than $ billion. Since , the program has served more than million participants.